Venice hotels: 11 Best for locations and value

Venice hotels: 11 Best for locations and value

Tags :

Category : Italy , Venice

Grand dame or boutique? Five star or three star? Forget the same old categories – for style and value, here’s the real-world luxury guide to Venice hotels

Choosing a hotel in Venice can be a labyrinthine process. An annual influx of 28 million tourists (compared to just 55,000 locals) means the calli are crammed with hotels, B&Bs, Airbnbs and self-catering options. Some are mind-blowing, others distinctly mediocre. How to sort the wheat from the chaff?

Best for design: Casa Flora

Casa Flora is a design-led hotel-Airbnb hybrid which aims to encourage sustainable tourism (Valentina Sommariva)

Brought to you by the Romanelli family, locals who own art deco-themed Novecento and the Hotel Flora next door, Casa Flora is a bold attempt to grab the younger, design-centric market with a three-bedroom apartment that’s a hybrid between a fancy Airbnb and a hotel – and a guaranteed Instagram smash.

It’s also an attempt at turning Venice tourism sustainable – everything in the flat, from the marble countertops to the parquet floor, is locally sourced and custom-made. Not that responsible means boring, here – lush plants drape themselves around the doorways and squat in bathroom basins, those countertops are jade, and the colour palettes revolve around lagoon hues – eau de nil, grey-blue and dirty creams.

Guests can use the Hotel Flora’s facilities next door, and there’s also a partnership with restaurant Estro, who’ll even send someone to come make you breakfast should you be feeling extravagant. Otherwise, breakfast is served next door in the Flora’s pretty courtyard.

Apartment from €600 (sleeps six), B&B
casafloravenezia.com​

Best B&B: Cima Rosa

Cima Rosa revolves round a pretty 15th-century courtyard just off the Grand Canal (Cima Rosa)

Not your average Venice digs, Cima Rosa is in lesser known Santa Croce, and is also rather more stylish than other affordable options. A 15th-century palazzo that was renovated by its architect and interior design owners, it sits on the Grand Canal (three of the rooms have prime views) yet manages to stay at one remove from the madness.

Inside, it’s equally unique – the Venetian-American couple who own it have gone for a sober palette of lagoon colours (eau de nil, grey, a hint of blue) paired with antiques they’ve done up themselves (they have a furniture restoration business).

It’s an intimate space, with just five rooms spread over two “wings” and communal areas including a courtyard and canalside living room-slash-kitchen, where continental breakfast is served and guests can cook for themselves. Owners Daniele and Brittany are hands-on hosts, and the feeling is of a chic friend’s house, rather than a B&B.

Doubles from €180, B&B
cimarosavenezia.com​

Best surprise: Bauer Palladio

Its wild, meadow-style gardens make the Bauer Palladio unlike any other Venice hotel (Bauer Hotels)

Was there ever a Venice hotel like this? Technically, yes – its sibling and neighbour, the breathtakingly pricey, Angelina-slept-here, butler-staffed Villa F. But even for those on an A-lister budget, to be honest, the Palladio is nicer. A conversion of a church and house for “fallen women” by 16th-century starchitect Andrea Palladio on Giudecca, the 58 rooms and 21 suites are spread across the main building and two blocks in the gardens.

The décor in the main building is slightly dated, as you’d expect from 16th-century digs, but the garden buildings are airy, tiki-influenced affairs, with ground-floor rooms opening directly onto the huge gardens, and a wild, flower-filled meadow breaking up the space. And if that sounds boho enough, know that the restaurant is vegan. The only thing missing is a pool.

Open March-November. Doubles from €180, B&B
palladiohotelspa.com

Best for atmosphere: Avogaria

The homely rooms at Avogaria give you a completely different view of Venice (Avogaria)

You’ll forget you’re in tourist town at Avogaria, a tiny, five-room residence at the far (read: local) end of Dorsoduro. The atmosphere is cosy – there’s even a fake cat curled up in the window – and the rooms a modern take on flouncy Venetian design (think mosaic walls and gilded mirrors), while three junior suites sport private walled gardens.

The hotel is a spin-off of the owner’s restaurant, so if it all gets too comfy, you can order the menu from room service, too.

Doubles from €100, B&B
avogaria.com​

Best for nightlife: Hotel l’Orologio

The rooms at Hotel L’Orologio are a bold departure from Venice norms (they’re not all this bold, though) (Hotel L’Orologio)

Technically the Hotel l’Orologio (Clock Hotel), it calls itself the Hotel L’O, which tells you something about the clientele. Dispensing with traditional Venetian style, the lobby is a design-led affair themed around antique timepieces, rooms have glowing cog-themed artwork above the headboards, and bright colours and semi-floating beds give a modern feel.

But despite being in the real world, at the L’O you’re also situated plum on the Grand Canal (some rooms have spectacular views), right by the buzzy bar area that’s sprung up around Rialto Mercato, so you can nip out for cichetti and an ombra (glass of wine) at Naranzaria or Bancogiro.

For a more self-sufficient stay (and to take advantage of the Rialto market nearby), the hotel has opened two apartments, both overlooking the Grand Canal.

Doubles from €215, B&B
hotelorologiovenezia.com

Best value: Liassidi Palace

The Liassidi Palace combines Venetian grandeur with off-the-beaten-track intimacy (SLH)

In a gothic palazzo in Castello, just east of San Marco, the Liassidi Palace has canal views, yet less of a scrum around it than those in the very centre. You’re well located for sightseeing here – the hotel sits between the Carpaccio paintings at the Scuola di San Giorgio degli Schiavoni and the Greek church with its tipsily leaning spire – as well as a quick walk to the less populated and more local part of Castello, around San Francesco della Vigna. Just 31 rooms take up the 15th-century palazzo, and the look is classic Venice, with heavy drapes, damask wall-coverings, flouncy headboards and chandeliers aplenty.

A member of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World group, it’s a good combination of affordability and intimacy, just steps from the action.

Doubles from €128, B&B
liassidipalacehotel.com​

Best grand dame: Centurion Palace

Centurion Palace’s brash colour schemes are a diversion from the Venice norm (Sina Hotels)

You may not want to like the Centurion Palace, if you’re in Venice for all things ancient. You may think the idea of gold-plated bathrooms – literally – is too much bling, that the modern, silver sculptures glittering in niches on the Grand Canal are “not authentic”. That the rooms – plain claret, rust-coloured, brown walls, even – are too modern for this most refined of cities. And then you’ll get there, and find your fears melt away.

It turns out that Centurion Palace is Italian-owned, modestly-roomed (there are just 50 in the vast property) and really rather lovely. The bar and restaurant both have seating cantilevered over the Grand Canal; there’s an inhouse cat, Centurione. Where other five-star hotels in Venice tend to be fairly stiff-atmosphered, the service here is notably friendly – staff are chatty, and conversations go two ways.

Walls are painted in plain, brash colours instead of swaddled in traditional damask and the corridors have modern photography rather than cod-renaissance portraits. And the Dorsoduro location is central but quiet – squished between the Salute church and Guggenheim collection, a 30-second traghetto ride from the sestiere of San Marco, but a couple of minutes to the Zattere, Venice’s most beautiful waterfront.

Doubles from €272, room only
sinahotels.com​

Best for bling: Palazzina

Palazzina is Philippe Starck at his most outré (Design Hotels)

The closest Venice gets to a W hotel are these Philippe Starck-designed digs in a 16th-century little palazzo (“palazzino”) next to art gallery Palazzo Grassi. Formerly known as Palazzina G, the 26 rooms are full of signature Starck touches: mirrored walls, ceilings and chairs, carnival masks and stools that look like silver-coated tree-stumps.

Two buildings spliced together make up the hotel: one set back from the water, whose rooms overlook the alleys below, the other an elegant, slim palazzo on the Grand Canal, squished between behemoths on either side. This one is where the suites are – and they’re actually some of the best-priced Grand Canal suites you’ll find, as former guest Johnny Depp can tell you.

There’s no check-in desk here – it’s way too cool for that – but there is a “Krug Lounge” (the second in the world) and a beautiful main room – low-lit and framed by Corinthian columns – which serves as a restaurant, bar and lobby area.

Doubles from €279, B&B. Grand Canal suites from €744, B&B
palazzinag.com

Best for couples: Palazzo Stern

Palazzo Stern is a townhouse conversion on the Grand Canal – complete with rooftop Jacuzzi (Palazzo Stern)

Everyone notices Palazzo Stern as the number 1 vaporetto glides up the Grand Canal and moors right beside it, at Ca’ Rezzonico. Not everyone, however, realises it’s a hotel, with its invisible signage and neat little garden, fringed by doric columns.

What used to be a house – built in the 15th century and ending up in the hands of a German art collector – has been converted into a 24-room property. The bedrooms themselves won’t win many design awards – they’re typical old-school Italian four-star – but the house itself is a gem, with a grand lobby, staircase, and rooftop hot tub.

Doubles from €175, B&B
palazzostern.it​

Best for solo travellers: Generator

Generator has ‘generated’ its own movida on Giudecca island (Jamie Smith)

If you’re looking for a scene, here’s where to find it, in an enormous warehouse on Giudecca converted into a “poshtel” by the stylish Generator group. On warm evenings, millennials spill out onto the waterfront outside, creating their own mini movida; inside are design-led dorms (think exposed brick walls and beamed ceilings) as well as five ensuite doubles, overlooking the water and San Marco in the distance.

Dorms from €14, doubles from €60, room only
generatorhostels.com​

Best for ease: Hotel Santa Chiara

Hotel Santa Chiara’s modern rooms are right by the bus terminal (Hotel Santa Chiara)

Staying by the bus depot isn’t generally the best plan. But in Venice – especially if you’re on a tight schedule, or have lots of luggage – things are a little different. The Santa Chiara sits at the mouth of the Grand Canal – not its most beautiful point, but a mere 20m from the airport bus stop. That means instead of sitting on the Alilaguna ferry to reach town (perhaps the most spectacular airport commute, but normally around 90 minutes) and then dragging your cases across bridges and around alleyways, you can get the bus from the airport to the Piazzale Roma terminus and go from Arrivals hall to your room in 25 minutes flat. Sans luggage, you can then walk to anywhere in Venice in about 15 minutes, rather than having to brave another long vaporetto ride. It is, it’s no exaggeration to say, revelatory.

The hotel is split across two buildings – a 19th-century convent and a concrete-ish modern building (adventurous or excrescence, depending on your sensibilities), which are joined in the middle so you don’t feel the split. Deluxe rooms are the ones to go for (classic rooms are in a separate annexe) – they’re modern and well equipped, with stylish feature wallpaper, comfy beds and faux walnut furniture. Breakfast is taken in a sunny room plum on the Grand Canal, while rooms can either have a canal view or one of the bus terminus behind (the latter are extremely well soundproofed, so there are no worries on that score).

The hotel is also wheelchair-accessible – as is Piazzale Roma – so if you have mobility issues, it’s an excellent base.

Doubles from €150, B&B
hotelsantachiara.it

We may earn some commission if you click on a link in this article and buy a product or service, but we never allow this to influence our coverage.

This article was first published in July 2017
Thanks to: Julia Buckley


10 Top Tourist Attractions in Venice

Tags :

Category : Italy , Venice

A city built on 118 islands off the coast of northeastern Italy, Venice is unlike any other city in Europe or, for that matter, the world. Virtually unchanged in appearance for more than 600 years, the City of Canals looks more like something out of a picture book than a modern metropolis. It’s a place where the entire city is viewed as an attraction in itself.

A city packed with great art and architecture, millions of visitors come each year to enjoy the experience that is Venice. Even at the height of tourist season, however, Venice is a travel destination that manages to exceed all expectations. Here are the top tourist attractions in Venice that make a visit to this Italian city so special.

10. Bridge of Sighs

Bridge of Sighs

 

Built in 1600, the Bridge of Sights connects the interrogation rooms in the Doge’s Palace to the New Prison across the Rio di Palazzo. It was designed by Antonio Contino whose uncle Antonio da Ponte had designed the Rialto Bridge. According to one theory the name of the bridge comes from the suggestion that prisoners would “sigh” at their final view of beautiful Venice through the window on their way to the executioner. In reality, the days of summary executions were over by the time the bridge was built and the cells under the palace roof were occupied mostly by small-time criminals.

9. San Giorgio Maggiore

San Giorgio Maggiore

 

Best known as the home of the 16th-century church of the same name, San Giorgio Maggiore is a small island located across the lagoon from St. Mark’s Square. Designed by the great Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio, the church features a façade clad in gleaming white marble and an open and airy interior that’s refreshingly bare of over-ornamentation. The main alter is graced by two of Tintoretto’s best paintings, the “Last Supper” and “The Fall of Manna.” Visitors can ride an elevator to the top of the church’s Neoclassic bell tower to enjoy a spectacular view of Venice.

8. Ca’ d’Oro

Ca' d'Oro

 

Originally known as the Palazzo Santa Sofia but now commonly known as the Ca’ d’Oro,the 15th century palazzo was designed by architect Giovanni Bon and his son Bartolomeo. Although the façade of this splendid structure no longer features the ornamentation that earned the place its “house of gold” nickname, the now pink-and-white building is a treasure trove of art. Located on the Grand Canal, the Ca’ d’Oro is home to the Museo Franchetti, named after the man who donated the palazzo and its entire contents of Renaissance paintings, antiques, sculpture and ceramics to the city.

7. Santa Maria della Salute

Santa Maria della Salute

 

Commonly called La Salute, this 17th-century church stands at the point where the Grand Canal meets the Venetian Lagoon. The white stone edifice with its massive dome was constructed as a shrine to the Virgin Mary for saving the city from a plague that killed one third of its population. In addition to the altar sculpture that depicts the “Madonna of Health” driving the demon Plague from Venice, there’s an extensive collection of works by Titian on display, including ceiling paintings of scenes from the Old Testament.

6. Ca’ Rezzonico

Ca' Rezzonico

 

Of all the stately palazzos that line the Grand Canal, no building better illustrates what life was like in 18th-century Venice than the Ca’ Rezzonico. Used as a setting for the 2005 film “Casanova” starring Heath Ledger, the palace’s Grand Ballroom has played host to over-the-top parties for more than 200 years. English poet Robert Browning was one of the last to make the palazzo his home. Today, the entire building is open to the public as the Museo del Settecento. While many of the paintings on display are reproductions, the fabulous ceiling frescoes by the Tiepolo family are authentic and have been restored to their original glory.

5. Piazza San Marco

Piazza San Marco

 

As the only public square in Venice, the Piazza San Marco has been the city’s main gathering place for centuries. Surrounded by open-air cafés and landmark attractions, including San Marco Basilica and the Palazzo Ducale, it’s the natural epicenter for any visit to the City of Canals. The square is actually laid out in a trapezoid shape that widens as it approaches the basilica. Despite the crowds that throng it in summer and the rains that flood it in winter, St. Mark’s Square offers a memorable Venetian experience in every season.

4. Rialto Bridge

Rialto Bridge

 

The Rialto Bridge is one of the four bridges spanning the Grand Canal. For nearly three hundred years, it was the only way to cross the Grand Canal on foot. The stone bridge, a single span designed by Antonio da Ponte, was completed in 1591 and was used to replace a wooden bridge that collapsed in 1524. The engineering of the bridge was considered so audacious that some architects predicted a future collapse. The bridge has defied its critics to become one of the architectural icons of Venice.

3. Doge’s Palace

Doge's Palace

 

During the prosperous centuries of the Venetian Republic, the city’s magistrates, or doges, ruled the city like royalty. The Palazzo Ducale was not only the residence of the doge but the city’s center of power and its administrative hub as well. The building was constructed in two phases. The eastern wing, which faces the Rio di Palazzo, was built between 1301 and 1340. The western wing, facing the Piazetta San Marco, took an additional 110 years to build and was completed in 1450. Visitors who take the Secret Itineraries tour can also walk through hidden passageways to view the private council rooms, torture chambers and the prison cell from which Giacomo Casanova made his escape in 1756.

2. Grand Canal

Grand Canal

 

There’s no better way to begin an exploration of Venice than with a gondola ride down the Grand Canal. In a city where cars are banned, gondolas, water taxis and public vaporetti (water buses) are the primary sources of transportation. The city’s aquatic thoroughfare snakes through the center of the city from Saint Mark’s Basilica to the Church of Santa Chiara. Lined on either side by Romanesque, Gothic and Renaissance structures, the Grand Canal is crossed by four bridges, the most famous of which is the 16th-century Rialto Bridge. The best time of the day for a gondola ride is in the early morning when the canal shimmers with golden light.

1. St. Mark’s Basilica & Campanile

#1 of Tourist Attractions In Venice

 

Situated in St. Mark’s Square, the soaring 30-story Campanile and the massive basilica behind it are two of the most popular tourist attractions in Venice. Both date to the 9th century but have been rebuilt and embellished extensively over the centuries. San Marco Basilica serves as a showcase for the wealth that Venice accumulated as a military power. Its design mixes Byzantine and Gothic architecture styles in a unique way. Elaborate medieval mosaics cover much of the cathedral’s walls and vaulting. Behind the tomb believed to hold the remains of Saint Mark stands the altarpiece Pala d’Oro, a jewel-adorned screen of gold that is considered one of the finest works of Byzantine craftsmanship in the world.

The Campanile is the bell tower of the St. Mark’s Basilica and one of Venice’s most recognizable landmarks. The current tower is an early twentieth century reconstruction of the original tower, which collapsed in 1902. An elevator brings visitors straight to the top of the campanile, where they have a great view over Venice and the lagoon.

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Hotels in Venice: 5 stars

Hotel Stars Discount Price per night, from Choose dates

Belmond Hotel Cipriani

★★★★★

-12%

1 4181 251

View Hotel

The Gritti Palace, A Luxury Collection Hotel

★★★★★

-26%

906673

View Hotel

Palazzo Venart Luxury Hotel

★★★★★

-16%

405341

View Hotel

Hotel Londra Palace

★★★★★

-25%

491367

View Hotel

San Clemente Palace Kempinski Venice

★★★★★

-20%

409329

View Hotel

Baglioni Hotel Luna - The Leading Hotels of the World

★★★★★

-16%

460387

View Hotel

Ca' Sagredo Hotel

★★★★★

-7%

292273

View Hotel

Hotel Excelsior Venice

★★★★★

-31%

362251

View Hotel

JW Marriott Venice Resort & Spa

★★★★★

-14%

287248

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Bauer Palladio Hotel & Spa

★★★★★

-21%

250198

View Hotel

The St. Regis Venice

★★★★★

-17%

594492

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Grand Hotel Dei Dogi, The Dedica Anthology, Autograph Collection

★★★★★

-8%

190176

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Hotel Metropole

★★★★★

-31%

292203

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PalazzinaG

★★★★★

-20%

432348

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Ausonia Hungaria Wellness & Lifestyle

★★★★★

-7%

275256

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Sina Centurion Palace

★★★★★

-8%

363333

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Hilton Molino Stucky Venice

★★★★★

-26%

278204

View Hotel


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