Top 10 Fairytale Towns in Greece

Top 10 Fairytale Towns in Greece

You’ve probably seen hundreds of photos of amazing Greek beaches, monuments, and sunsets while scrolling on Instagram and made yourself a long list of – must-see in Greece.

But, believe it. The photos often don’t do justice to the reality which makes it almost impossible to choose just which are the best places to visit in Greece. The list would be endless. Add in the extra elements of incredible Mediterranean cuisine and friendly, hospitable people, and once you’re there, you may even find you never want to leave.

Whether you’re thinking of visiting the mainland or are planning on touring some of the islands, wherever you go, you’ll find Greece is a magical country. Not sure where to start? Here’s a list of the ten best towns in Greece, none of which you’re going to want to miss out on.

10. Plaka, Athens

Think of Athens, the capital city of Greece, and the first thing which comes to mind will probably be some of its famous monuments like the Acropolis or the Parthenon. Those aside, the city has a distinct character which is unique from other European capitals.

Athens evolved from what was originally a mass of small villages which have merged together over the centuries. Most of those villages have lost their original characteristics and are indistinct from each other. The neighborhood known as Plaka hasn’t.

In Plaka, there are cobbled streets lined with cafes and restaurants with colorfully furnished terraces. Narrow pedestrianized alleys where traditional Ouzerias and the local bakery are flanked by eclectic souvenir shops. You’ll come across lively venues like Bretto’s which has been operating since the early twentieth century. Once the site of a distillery, it’s now a bar with walls decorated with bottles.

Explore further and you’ll find Anafiotika, another part of Plaka. The locality, with its blue-doored white houses and stepped streets decorated with flower pots, will have you imagining you’ve been teleported from the city to one of the quieter, less-developed islands.

Why Go? Plaka is the most beautiful area of Athens and is alive with traditional Greek character. Not visiting Plaka while you’re in Athens is missing out the best part – the heart and soul of the city.

Narrow street in Anafiotika, Plaka district, Athens, Greece

Narrow street in Anafiotika, Plaka district, Athens, Greece

9. Assos, Kefalonia (Cephalonia), Ionian

Hop on a plane from Athens airport, and within an hour you’ll be disembarking on the largest island in the Ionian chain – Kefalonia. This island has all the visual elements which make Greece so memorable. White sand beaches in secluded bays surrounded by pine-covered cliffs, picturesque harbor towns, and quaint, rustic villages. Kefalonia also has some incredible natural wonders like the Melissani Lake Cave which just have to be seen to be believed.

There’s one particular village on Kefalonia which has to be on your list of best places to see in Greece, and that’s Assos. Assos is a tiny hamlet of pastel-colored houses with a population of just one hundred. It nestles, at the base of a hill on a small peninsula, on the north-west coast of Kefalonia and is surrounded on three sides by the stunning blue of the Mediterranean Sea. The village, which is overlooked by the ruins of a Venetian castle, has a pebble beach and small marina lined with traditional restaurants. Idyllic doesn’t even begin to describe it.

Why Go? Life has a different pace in uncommercialized Assos. It’s the perfect place to chill out and really relax. Explore the village and the ruins, swim, then dine by the sea on some real Greek food. Vacations don’t get any better than that.

White blue boats in Assos village, Kefalonia island, Greece

White blue boats in Assos village, Kefalonia island, Greece

8. Naxos Town (Chora), Naxos, Cyclades

The largest island of the Cyclades, a group of two hundred Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, is Naxos. It’s well known for its picture postcard appearance, historical monuments and surprisingly, its top quality potatoes.

If you love art and history, Naxos Town or Chora will be a must see in Greece for you. The town’s square-shaped houses lined up on a hillside in tiered layers resemble a Cubist artwork. For the historians, the town has a thirteenth-century castle inside which there’s a thriving community. Enter through its gate, and the explore the Kastro’s streets of cobbles. You’ll discover Venetian mansions, churches, the Kastro cathedral in the main square, museums and a monastery in this community nucleus.

For a historically artistic sunset photo opportunity, head out of town and up the hillside to Apollo’s Temple. This impressive ruin of the temple entrance stands like a photo frame waiting to catch the sun between the columns of its lintel-ed arch. Now that’s a seriously Instagramable snap.

Why Go? Visiting Naxos is to immerse yourself in living history. Walk around the Kastro, the community within the castle walls and you’ll feel as if you taken a leap back in time. Fascinating.

The Portara or the Great Door, entrance to the Apollo Temple. Naxos, Greece

The Portara or the Great Door, entrance to the Apollo Temple. Naxos, Greece

7. Parga, Northern Greece

If being by a great beach is somewhere near the top of your list for the perfect vacation location, then Parga would be one of the best Greek towns you could go to. The coastal town, which sits below the ruins of a castle, has none of the hustle and bustle you’d expect in an urban spread of its size.

Think tranquil stretches of glorious sand between outcrops of stunning pine-clad limestone cliffs, because Parga is all about beautiful beaches and views as scenic as you’ll find on any of the islands. Krioneri beachLichnos beach or Valtos beach, take your pick, they’re all within a few minutes walking distance of the town.

Parga’s isn’t short on nightlife either. After dark, the bars and taverns on the harbor front spring into action and you can party through the night until the sun comes up.

Travel anywhere in Greece, and you’ll see grove after grove of olive trees. The oil produced from the olive harvest is an essential ingredient in Greek life. Its importance is honored in the Paragaea Olive Oil Museum which exhibits antique machinery and information on the processes used for extracting the oil. Don’t miss out on sampling some.

Why Go? Visiting Parga is like visiting several of the Ionian islands all at once. It may be on the mainland but its characteristics are the same as Corfu or Kefalonia plus you’ll learn all about the most important ingredient in Greek cuisine – olive oil.

The island of Panagia off the coast of Parga, Greece

The island of Panagia off the coast of Parga, Greece

6. Mykonos Town (Chora), Mykonos, Cyclades

If you like to party to dawn and be in with the in-crowd, then Mykonos Town is the best place in Greece for you to visit. While the island of Mykonos, which is in the Cyclades chain, might only cover an area of thirty-three square miles, it’s an island which has dominated the Greek social scene for years. Yes, it has a reputation for being as wild, if not wilder, than Ibiza and it’s a reputation it lives up to.

Be prepared to be blinded by the morning sunshine and the bright, whiteness of the houses when you leave the clubs. You may even need to elbow your way through the crowds if a cruise ship has docked in the harbor. That’s all part of Mykonos’s charm.

Is there more to Mykonos Town than bars and nightclubs? Yes, there is. Little Venice is a part of the town where the houses and restaurants go right up to the waterfront. It’s quaint, and the narrow streets behind are an interesting labyrinth of boutiques and bars. The cluster of five windmills on the town’s coastline makes for an iconic Instagram photo if you snap them at sunset. The Mama Mia-style, Panagia Paraportiani church with its white-washed walls and arched bell tower is one of the most photogenic buildings in Greece.

Why Go? Mykonos Town is the place in Greece to see, be seen and party like you’ve never partied before. Do you need any better reason to go than that?

Beautiful street of Mykonos village, Greece

Beautiful street of Mykonos village, Greece

5. Lindos, Rhodes, Dodecanese

One of the best Greek towns to visit for combining beach time with viewing ancient monuments is Lindos on the island of Rhodes. The town sits in a beautiful bay edged with golden sands. Above it on a prominent hillside is a fortress-like acropolis which dates from around 200 BC.

While Lindos is picture perfect with narrow cobbled streets full of flowers and trailing vines, it’s the acropolis which is attention-grabbing. Enter through the medieval gateway and inside is another world, an ancient one, where there’s a lot to explore. Discover the Doric temple with impressive columns, Hellenistic stairways, the remains of a Roman temple and a pentagonal tower which was part of the castle built by the Knights of St John. There are donkey rides from the town to the acropolis, but it’s not a difficult walk, so avoid using the overworked animals and give them a break if you can.

For a day on the beach, head to St Paul’s Bay. The tiny, sheltered cove has super clear turquoise waters which are perfect for snorkeling.

Why Go? Lindos is the ideal town to combine spending leisurely days on the beach with fascinating archaeological explorations.

Acropolis of Lindos. Doric columns of the ancient Temple of Athena and the bay of St. Paul. Lindos, Rhodes, Greece

Acropolis of Lindos. Doric columns of the ancient Temple of Athena and the bay of St. Paul. Lindos, Rhodes, Greece

4. Monemvasia, Peloponnese

Monemvasia lies just off the coast of the Greek Peloponnese, and although it is an island, a narrow causeway connects it to the mainland. From a distance, Monemvasia appears to be a gigantic and lifeless mound of arid rock. It isn’t until you’re actually on it that it reveals its impressive secrets.

On this tiny islet, shrouded by the presence of the central rock formation and hidden from view, is a medieval walled citadel. Go through the tunnel entrance, and you’ll be in a world that time has forgotten. Stroll the cobbled streets lined with empty houses. There are very few people living in the fortress, and no cars are permitted inside, so it’s eerily quiet once you’re away from the center. There are a few hotels, a couple of tavernas and some souvenir shops. The island also has two beautiful beaches. One right by the castle walls and the other around two miles away which you can walk to.

Why Go? Live the fairytale by staying in a castle surrounded on all sides by the sea. Monemvasia is one of the most romantic places in Greece and is ideal for an intimate couples vacation.

Panoramic view of the medieval castletown of Monemvasia, Peloponnese, Greece

Panoramic view of the medieval castletown of Monemvasia, Peloponnese, Greece

3. Chania Town, Crete

Chania Town on the island of Crete is overflowing with authentic Greek character. From the colorful Venetian harbor which is lined with cafeterias and restaurants, to the labyrinth of back streets full of shops and boutiques in the Old Town, it teems with life both day and night. The Cretan cuisine is unbeatable, and the harbor is the best place to try some of the local fish.

Stroll along the mile-long sea wall to photograph the lighthouse or snap a sly shot of the fishermen sitting on their boats working at mending their nets. Trek up to the small church of Profitis Ilias, and you’ll be rewarded with stunning panoramic vistas of the whole of Chania town.

While you’re in Chania, you won’t want to miss out on seeing two of the best beaches in the world. Elafonisi, famous for its pink sand and crystal-clear sea, and Balos, the tranquil lagoon with white sand and turquoise waters. They’re both some distance from the town but are must-see places when you’re in Greece. That goes for the Samaria Gorge too. It’s an hour’s drive from Chania, but hiking through the gorge’s incredible landscape is something you’ll never forget.

Why Go? If you can only visit one Greektown, make it Chania. It has everything you could dream of and more, so you won’t miss out on a thing.

Famous Old Venetian Harbour in Chania, Crete, Greece

Famous Old Venetian Harbour in Chania, Crete, Greece

2. Kastraki, Meteora

Kastraki is a small Greek town in the region of Meteora on mainland Greece and is the best Greek town to visit for seeing the Meteora monasteries. Wake up in the morning, open the patio doors and you will see the UNESCO World Heritage Site from your balcony.

The Meteora monasteries are one of Greece’s most famous landmarks. The medieval monasteries sit atop incredible pillars of rock, most of which are over a thousand feet high. Now accessible by steps carved into the rocks, there was a time when provisions and people were hauled up the cliff sides in nets attached to ropes. Thankfully, that no longer happens.

Kastraki itself is an archaeological delight of stone houses with red-tiled roofs adorned with flowers. Its location right under the towering pinnacles is tranquil and otherworldly. The only noise to disturb your sleep will be the crowing of the roosters at dawn. The countryside which surrounds Meteora is great for hiking, and if you’re a rock climber, you’ll find a new challenge everywhere you turn.

Why Go? Without seeing them for yourself, you can’t imagine the grandeur and magnitude of the Meteora monasteries. Their impressiveness leaves a lasting impression.

Meteora rock and town of Kastraki in Greece

Meteora rock and town of Kastraki in Greece

1. Oia, Santorini, Cyclades

Oia on the Cyclades island of Santorini is in essence what most people imagine when they think of Greek towns. Whitewashed houses snug against a cliffside dominated by the blue domes of a church. Yes, Oia is that typical image made reality and is stunningly picture postcard perfect.

Because of its geographical position, Oia has the most amazing sunsets every day. It’s something which hasn’t gone unnoticed, and the town gets inundated with crowds of tourists as well as visitors from cruise ships which dock in the harbor. The influx doesn’t spoil the town though, and it’s a great place for trying Greek food, enjoying the views and just relaxing on the beach.

Oia is one of the best Greek towns for taking photographs. The town poses as well as any supermodel, and if you’re a novice photographer, you’ll be over the moon with the results you get from snapping Oia and the sunsets.

Why Go? Oia is one of the most photogenic spots in all of Greece. Blues skies, blue seas, and white buildings which reflect the light. Oia is a photographer’s dream.

Oia in Santorini, Greece

Thanks to: Pando Trip


10 Best Greek Islands

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Category : Europe , Greece

The beautiful and exotic Greek islands lure droves of tourists every year, making them one of the world’s top travel destinations. However, with hundreds of islands to choose from, planning a trip can be a bit of a dilemma. To help you maximize the best of your travel experience, check out the following list of the best Greek islands.

10. Kos

Kos

 

Characterized by long strips of clean, white beaches and rolling farmland rich in grapes, figs, olives, corn and wheat, the island of Kos offers beautiful landscapes, historic sites and great beaches all in a relaxed atmosphere. You can explore attractions like the ruins of an ancient marketplace and the 14th century fortress built by The Knights of Saint John of Rhodes. In the charming city center of whitewashed buildings in Kos Town, you will find an abundant selection of hotels, restaurants, bars and nightclubs.

9. Paros 

Paros

 

Paros is one of the most picturesque of the Greek isles with its charming old towns of cobblestone streets, whitewashed buildings and vibrant vines of bougainvilleas. Because of its many convenient ferry connections, Paros makes a great base if you want to visit other islands in the Cyclades. If you are looking for an attractive nightlife scene, you will be spoiled for choice on this Greek island as it offers many towns that feature a wide range of restaurants, bars and nightclubs. The beaches on Paros are plentiful as well, ranging from the quiet and remote to the more crowded where windsurfing competitions are frequently hosted.

8. Samos 

Samos

 

Considered one of the sunniest destinations in all of Europe, Samos is where you will discover stunning pebble beaches and crystal clear waters, which are ideal for scuba diving and snorkeling. Never tried these fun water activities? Don’t worry, the island of Samos offers you plenty of classes and instructors to provide you with a wonderful experience. Significant sites to see on Samos include the ruins of the Temple of Hera as well as the Eupalinian aqueduct, which is regarded as an ancient engineering marvel.

7. Chios 

Chios

 

Separated from Turkey by a narrow strait and part of the Northeastern Aegean Islands, Chios is an ideal place for sightseeing. Situated in the center of the island is its most notable historic site, Nea Moni, an 11th century monastery. In the southern region of the island, visitors can explore several medieval villages with their ancient walls and towers. You will likely see a variety of colorful tulips growing in this area as well. If your visit is during the Easter holiday, you might find it interesting to watch a unique tradition in the town of Vrontados where locals practice a friendly church war during Easter services.

6. Corfu

Corfu

 

Of all the best islands in Greece, Corfu probably offers the most variety of everything from its blend of ethnic cultures to its contrasting landscapes and array of attractions. An island steeped in Byzantine history and Greek mythology, Corfu features charming old towns laced with the varying architectural styles of its Greek, Italian, French and British past. Outside the towns, tourists will discover some of Greece’ most beautiful beaches, some still unspoiled. No matter what your interests are, this Ionian island offers many interesting attractions from historic sites to modern museums and a vibrant nightlife.

Read More: Top Tourist Attractions in Corfu

5. Skiathos 
Skiathos

 

Nature lovers will not want to miss a visit to the island of Skiathos in the Sporades. One of the most northern of the Greek Islands, Skiathos features vast hills of lush pines and sandy beaches while offering plenty of wildlife viewing and a nature conservatory. Other interesting attractions on the island include ancient monasteries, medieval castles, Byzantine churches and fascinating museums.

4. Rhodes

Rhodes

 

If you love history, you don’t want to miss out on a visit to Rhodes. Located near the coast of Turkey in the Dodecanese, this beautiful island packs many historic treasures such as its medieval Old Town, the Temple of Apollo, the Acropolis of Lindos, the Governor’s Palace, Rhodes Footbridge and more. This island of exotic, Turkish influences also features popular beach resorts and charming villages with friendly locals.

Read More: Top Tourist Attractions in Rhodes

3. Crete 

Crete

 

As the largest of the Greek islands, Crete is also the most populated. Crete is where you will find the most variety in hotel accommodation, restaurants, shops and nightclubs. Because this island features beautiful beaches, scenic mountains and gorges, you can enjoy a wide range of outdoor activities here like hiking, mountain climbing, horse riding, gorge trekking, swimming and more. History lovers will want to explore the many historic and archaeological sites that dot the island such as Knossos Palace, which dates back to the Minoan civilization.

Read More: Top Tourist Attractions in Crete

2. Mykonos 

Mykonos

 

Mykonos is famed as a cosmopolitan destination amongst the Greek islands. Mykonos Town (also known as Chora) is a stunningly picturesque Greek town with a maze of tiny streets and whitewashed steps lanes. Although the streets are lined with small shops, boutiques, art galleries, cafes, bars and restaurants, Mykonos Town has not completely lost its identity. Thanks to Mykonos’s strict building regulations its traditional Cycladic architectural style and character has remained firmly intact.

Read More: Top Attractions in Mykonos

1. Santorini

#1 of Best Greek Islands

 

Part of the Cyclades group of the Greek islands, Santorini is famous for its dramatic views, stunning sunsets, the white-washed houses, and its very own active volcano. Fira, the capital of Santorini, is a marriage of Venetian and Cycladic architecture, whose white cobblestone streets bustle with shops, tavernas, hotels and cafes, while clinging on the edge of a high cliff. If you arrive by sea you can take a cable car up from the port or alternatively take a trip on a mule up the 588 zigzagging steps.

Read More: Top Things to Do in Santorini


10 Top Tourist Attractions in Rhodes

With its famous archeological ruins and pretty beaches, Rhodes is one of the top tourist destinations in Europe. This is perhaps as it should be as it’s the largest of Greece’s Dodecanese Islands. The island is probably most famous for the Colossus of Rhodes, a statue of the Greek sun god Helios that was destroyed by an earthquake in 226 BC. Rhodes gives travelers a unique opportunity to explore ancient temple ruins and then chill out on a beautiful sandy beach while contemplating the marvels of an earlier world. An overview of the top attractions in Rhodes:

10. Mandraki Harbor

Mandraki Harbor

 

Mandraki Harbor is one of three harbors on Rhodes and the only yacht harbor. It is thought one of the Seven Wonders of the World, the statue Colossus of Rhodes once stood in this harbor. Travelers today will find deer sculptures, medieval windmills and the St. Nicholas fortress at the entrance. The windmills were once used to grind grain brought to the harbor by ancient cargo ships; most have disintegrated, but three have been renovated. Mandraki Harbor was once the military port for Rhodes and could be closed by chains. Now yachts, cruise ships and fishing boats share the harbor.

9. Ancient Kamiros

Ancient Kamiros

 

Kamiros is an ancient city on the northwest coast of Rhodes. Kamiros is one of three Doric cities that combined with two others to form the city-state of Rhodes. Its residents, however, gradually abandoned Kamiros to move to the city of Rhodes. Mentioned by Homer in his writings, forests covered the city until ancient graves were discovered in 1929 and an excavation of Kamiros began. Archaeologists believe a temple to Athena topped the Acropolis, but it was destroyed in a 226 BC earthquake. The city was built on three levels: the Acropolis on top, residents in the middle, and water reservoirs on the bottom.

8. Anthony Quinn Bay

Anthony Quinn Bay

 

Anthony Quinn may have been from Mexico, but he filmed several movies in Greece, including Zorba the Greek and Guns of the Navarone, which was filmed at Faliraki. While there, the actor bought the bay part of the island. Because of this, the bay was renamed from Vagies Bay to Anthony Quinn Bay, which is just over a mile from Faliraki. Because of its rock surroundings and crystal clear emerald water, it’s considered one of the most beautiful beaches on Rhodes. The bay is a popular mooring spot for sail boats and small watercraft.

7. Tsambika Monastery

Tsambika Monastery

 

Travelers looking for tremendous scenic views in a religious setting may enjoy a visit to Tsambika Monastery that is situated on a hill. The hill, about 25 km (15 miles) from Rhodes city, is topped by a small Byzantine church dedicated to Our Lady. A local legend says if an infertile woman climbs the hill she will be blessed with a child, which must be named after the monastery. The legend must be true since many island residents answer to this name. Origins of the first monastery are unclear, but a working monastery was constructed in 1770.

6. Faliraki Beach

Faliraki Beach

 

Travelers who are party animals are likely to gravitate to Faliraki beach, the most popular seaside resort on Rhodes. By day, visitors laze under colorful striped umbrellas on the beach; by night, they find entertainment under brightly colored neon lights. From shopping to bungee-jumping, Faliraki beach has it all. Faliraki also is home to the largest water park in Europe where visitors can do down a variety of slides; the park has a special section for children. Visitors can enjoy themselves under safe conditions, since Faliraki beach has 12 Blue Flags from the Foundation for Environmental Education with its strict safely standards.

5. Lindos Beach

Lindos Beach

 

Located 50 km (31 miles) south of Rhodes city, Lindos is a popular tourist destination because of its ancient ruins and great beaches. With a history that dates back to the 10th century BC, Lindos was once a meeting place for the Greeks and Phoenicians, and later became a major trading center. It once had a large temple complex that fell into disuse during the early medieval period; it is an important archaeological site today. The beach itself is a busy place, with many British residents spending entire summers here. The deep blue bay waters make Lindos Beach an especially pretty tourist attraction in Rhodes.

4. Monolithos Castle

Monolithos Castle

 

At one time, Monolithos Castle was considered one of the most powerful fortresses on Rhodes. Built in 1470, not much of the castle remains today save the external walls. One thing that does remain, however, is the stupendous view at the top of the hill that overlooks the sea. In order to enjoy the view, hardy visitors will have to climb up via small steep stone steps; the climb is strenuous, so past visitors recommend frequent breaks to rest. Inside the castle that was built on a former castle, travelers will find two 15th century chapels.

3. Tsambika Beach

Tsambika Beach

 

Tsambika Beach is considered one of the most beautiful beaches on Rhodes. It’s hard to dispute that: Turquoise blue waters lap on the half-mile of pure golden sand beach. Owned by the Orthodox church, Tsambika Beach is overlooked by a peak where stands the Tsambika Monastery. Because the water is shallow and sandy, the beach is considered a good place for families to have fun in the sun, either lying under an umbrella or participating in water sports. A section of the beach is set aside for visitors who prefer to go au naturel.

2. Acropolis of Lindos

Acropolis of Lindos

 

Since it was occupied by so many forces, from the Greeks to the Ottomans, the Acropolis of Lindos is an interesting site archaeologically. It’s also a scenic site since it sits on a 115-meter (380-foot) high rock overlooking the sea. Access is by a steep hike up a footpath, but worth the trip. Once at the top, visitors will find a well preserved Acropolis enclosed by battlements, 20 white Hellenistic columns and remains of the temple to Athena Lindia. There’s no shade at the top, so visitors may want to wear hats and take along water to drink.

1. Medieval Town of Rhodes

#1 of Tourist Attractions In Rhodes

 

Occupiers over the centuries have left their stamp on the Medieval Town of Rhodes, which dates back hundreds of years before the birth of Christ. The conquerors that had the most influence over this ancient city were the Order of the Knights of Saint Jon or Jerusalem that occupied Rhodes from 1308 to 1523. The Palace of the Grand Masters which functioned as their headquarters is one of the greatest monuments erected in the Middle Ages. The Upper Town, with its Street of the Knights and 4 km (2.5 mile) long wall, is considered a very beautiful example of Gothic architecture The Lower Town features embellishments such as mosques and public baths that were added by the Ottomans. By foot is the best way to explore this gems.


10 Top Tourist Attractions in Crete

Category : Crete , Europe , Greece

Stunning Crete is the largest of the Greek Islands, and also the fifth largest in the Mediterranean. It boasts gorgeous beaches and mountains and is dotted with quaint villages. During the Bronze Age, this beautiful island was the home to the Minoan civilization, which is considered to be the first advanced European civilization, so there are also many historical attractions in Crete. Besides Minoan ruins, visitors can also still see the remains of Ancient Greece, the Venetian era, and the Ottoman period scattered around this island today.

10. Arkadi Monastery

Arkadi Monastery

 

The Arkadi Monastery was the site of one of the most tragic incidents in Crete’s history. In 1866, the Cretan residents, who were then under Turkish rule, decided to revolt. At one point during the rebellion, more than 940 Greeks, mostly women and children, took sanctuary in the monastery. The Turks lay siege to the monastery for three days and were finally able to break into its gates. At that point, the refugees decided to end their lives rather than be taken prisoner, and blew up barrels of gunpowder, which ended up killing hundreds of Turks and Cretans. The incident sparked sympathy and worldwide attention for the plight of the people of Crete. The monastery, which has been around since about the 12th century, was restored in 1870.

9. Rethymnon Old Town

Rethymnon Old Town

 

The old town of Rethymnon (or Rethimno) is located in the midst of the modern city and features a rather unique blend of Venetian and Crete architecture. Rethymnon was established in 1204, after the Venetians had conquered Crete, so most of the remaining buildings in the old town area are of Venetian creation. The Old Town’s narrow streets and its small Venetian harbor are wonderful for walking, shopping, enjoying dinner at a small tavern and taking in Rethymnon’s remarkable architecture. Travelers will want to check out the nearby Fortezza Castle, which was built in 1590, and sits on a low hill in the middle of Rethymnon.

8. Agios Nikolaos 

Agios Nikolaos

 

Situated on lovely Mirabello Bay in eastern Crete, Agios Nikolaos offers visitors a mix of the modern and the traditional. It is a medium-size port town that is extremely picturesque and has some style and charm, which it exploits to the full. The town’s Lake Voulismeni, which is lined with charming small cafes and boutiques, has been the subject of a number of legends. One myth is that the goddess Athena used to bathe in this almost perfectly circular body of water. Another legend claims that this beautiful lake is bottomless. Agios Nikolaos is one of Crete’s most popular tourist destinations.

7. Elafonisi Beach

Elafonisi Beach

 

While all of Crete’s beaches are beautiful, there is something very special about the beaches that can be found on the island of Elafonisi. Located in South-west Crete, Elafonisi is separated from Crete’s shores by a very shallow lagoon. In fact, it is so shallow that visitors can easily walk the 200 meters (650 feet) to the island. The waters around this island are crystal clear, and its sand ranges from sparkling white to a soft pink hue. This island’s beaches are very popular with locals and visitors, so it can be a bit crowded in some areas. Travelers who want to avoid the crowds can just walk a little farther in, where they’ll find plenty of nice, quiet spots.

6. Spinalonga

Spinalonga

 

Spinalonga is an island fortress on the southwestern entrance to the Gulf of Elounda. It used to be part of the nearby Peninsula Spinalonga, however in 1526, the Venetians cut a canal through it to separate the two. The island was also fortified and, for many years, was the first line of defense for Elounda. From 1903 to 1957, Spinalonga, was used as a leper colony for people from all over Greece who were suffering from the disease. Today, Spinalonga is just a short boat ride away from both Elounda and Agios Nikolaos and is popular with tourists, who come to the island to see the remnants of the abandoned leper colony, the fortress and numerous old structures. However, visits to this island are limited to a few hours, as there are no accommodations on Spinalonga.

5. Heraklion Archaeological Museum

Heraklion Archaeological Museum

 

The Heraklion Archaeological Museum enjoys the reputation of being one of the most important museums in Greece, especially when it comes to its collection of Minoan artifacts and artwork. Visitors to this museum can enjoy seeing fragments of the original frescoes from the Minoan Palace of Knossos. The Heraklion Archaeological Museum also has exhibits dedicated to all of the periods of Crete prehistory and history, up until the late Roman periods. Highlights include statues of the Snake Goddess, the famous Bull-Leaping Fresco and the enigmatic Phaistos Disk. In addition, the artifacts found in this museum were all discovered in Crete.

4. Balos Lagoon

Balos Lagoon

 

One of Crete’s most beautiful beaches, Balos Lagoon is located near the town of Kissamos. Sandwiched between the small island of Imeri Gramvousa and Crete itself, the beach is accessible by boat or car. Visitors are greeted with a stunning vista created by an outcropping of rock that is surrounded by pink sand and blue and turquoise water. This is arguably the most photographed natural attraction in Crete, which causes tourists to visit in massive numbers. The months of July and August are the busiest.

3. Chania Old Venetian Harbor

Chania Old Venetian Harbor

 

This harbor was built between the years 1320 and 1356 by the Venetians and was an important trade center until the early 20th century. The harbor could not accommodate larger ships, so the port was eventually abandoned by big vessels in favor of Souda’s harbor. Today, though, Chania’s old harbor is still used by smaller boats and yachts. The harbor’s crowning jewel is its lighthouse, which was built by the Venetians around 1595 to 1601, and is one of the oldest in the world. Most people come here to enjoy a stroll through the harbor, sip their coffee or have breakfast with a view of the lighthouse or enjoy a meal in one of the many restaurants and ouzo shops.

2. Samaria Gorge

Samaria Gorge

 

Some sites require more effort to enjoy than others, and Samaria Gorge is one of those. Located in the National Park of Samarai in the White Mountains, this stunning gorge is a ten-mile downhill hike that ends at a black-sand beach in Agia Roumelli on the Libyan sea. It passes through forests of ancient cypresses and pines, then cuts between vertical cliffs through the mountains. Depending on a person’s speed and fitness level, this hike can take between four to seven hours. At the end of the trek, most hikers hire a boat to take them to Chora Sfakion.

1. Palace of Knossos

#1 of Tourist Attractions In Crete

 

Located some 5 km (3 miles) south of Heraklion, the Palace of Knossos is the most important and best known Minoan site in Crete. Knossos is also often associated with the legend of the Athenian hero Theseus killing the Minotaur. The great palace was built gradually between 1700 and 1400 BC, with periodic rebuildings after destruction until it was devastated once and for all by fire. Knossos incorporated numerous rooms such as the Throne Room, named for a large chair that is built into the wall, facing several benches. The main function of the palace is still under debate. It could have been used primarily as an administrative or a religious center.


22 Top Tourist Attractions in Athens

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Category : Baltic States

Athens is a sprawling city established among seven historic hills and surrounded by remarkable mountains. Inhabited for more than 3,000 years, Athens is widely known as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy. Consisting of a large city center, an urban district and metropolitan area, Athens presents a confusing blend of historical and modern features.

The city is famous for its archaeological ruins and monuments. However, Athens is not just about ancient ruins. This bustling city is also an important center for culture, nightlife and sports. An overview of the top tourist attractions in Athens.

22. Theatre of Dionysus

Theatre of Dionysus

 

Travelers who are mad about theatre won’t want to miss the Theatre of Dionysus, the oldest theatre in Greece. Many of the most famous ancient Greek comedies and tragedies debuted on the stage here. The theatre, originally a temple built in the sixth century BC, is dedicated to Dionysus, the god of merriment and wine. Cut into a cliff on the Acropolis, the theatre could seat 17,000 people. It has been continuously remodeled over the centuries. The best views of the Theatre of Dionysus, usually credited as the birthplace of European theatre, can be seen from higher up on the Acropolis.

21. Byzantine and Christian Museum

Byzantine and Christian Museum

 

The glories of Greek Orthodox Christianity await visitors to the Byzantine and Christian Museum in Athens. The museum is chock full of more than 25,000 artifacts relating to Grecian artifacts from approximately the third to the 20th centuries. The exhibits include artifacts from regions where Hellenism took root, and covers the Byzantium, post-Byzantium, medieval and early Christian periods. Some of its holdings are rare, including collections of pottery, manuscripts, fabrics and frescoes. It has one of the largest collections of Byzantine art in the world. The museum has a collection of marble and limestone slabs and icons.

20. Roman Agora

Roman Agora

 

Centuries ago, shoppers may have rubbed shoulders with the likes of Julius Caesar and Augustus since they helped fund the Roman Agora. In contrary to the Ancient Agora which it replaced, it had a purely commercial character. The Roman Agora was built during the waning years of the first century BC when Greece was part of the Roman Empire. The new agora featured a large open space surrounded by colonnades and columns; shops were inside these borders. The 12-meter (40-foot) Tower of Wind, just east of the Roman market, features reliefs of the eight winds with a sundial underneath each.

19. Museum of Cycladic Art

Museum of Cycladic Art

 

What started out in the 1960s as two people acquiring artifacts associated with Greece’s Cyclades Islands resulted in a world-class collection of Cycladic art. The Museum of Cycladic Art opened in 1986 featuring more than 3,000 artifacts and figures created between 3300 and 1100 BC on the Aegean Sea archipelago. Some of the marble figurines are lifelike in size. The statues feature nude people in an abstract or simple style and are said to have influenced 20th century artists such as Modigliani and Brancusi. Some artifacts are in groups such a heroes and gods to better give a picture of ancient Greek civilization.

18. Philopappos Hill

Philopappos Hill

 

The Acropolis may be the most famous hill in Athens, but Philopappos Hill isn’t far behind. It also has an ancient history. Ancient Greeks believed the nine muses lived there and eventually named the hill after a monument to Philopappos, a Roman senator who is considered a benefactor of Athens. At 147 meters (482 feet) high, it offers great views of the Acropolis and the rest of Athens. To the south, the Aegean Sea can be seen on a clear day. Philopappos is buried in a marble tomb in 115 AD at the highest point on the hill.

17. Temple of Athena Nike

Temple of Athena Nike

 

There’s something indescribably graceful about the Temple of Athena Nike that has been standing in a prominent spot on the Acropolis since 420 BC. Athena was the goddess of war and wisdom. Nike is the Greek word for victory. It was at this temple the ancient Greeks prayed for victory in a war against Sparta. The temple was destroyed in the 17th century during a war between the Venetians and the Turks, but was rebuilt. It’s famous for a “wet drapery” (a type of sculpture in which “fabric” drapes over a nude body) of Nike adjusting her sandal.

16. Anafiotika

Anafiotika

 

Ruins aren’t the only things worth visiting in Athens. In-between the ancient and the sparkling new lies Anafiotika, an old neighborhood that is worth a wander. This picturesque slice of Athens can be found below the Acropolis and just north of the historic neighborhood of Plaka. Anafiotika was built by workers from the Cyclade island of Anafi in the 1860s on the order of King Otto I. Many of the houses were destroyed in the 1950s for archeological digs, but 45 of the original houses remain. The houses feature Cycladic style architecture, reminiscent of that found on the Greek Islands. The modest houses are still inhabited and many are decorated with colorful bougainvillea.

15. Benaki Museum

Benaki Museum

 

The Benaki Museum, housed in the Benaki family’s former mansion, is home to an outstanding collection of art representing various stages of Greek culture. Its holdings include 120,000 works of art starting in prehistoric times and ending today. With 181,000 books, it is Greece’s largest Muslim library, though they are housed in one of the museum’s four satellite facilities. The museum also has an extensive collection of Asian art. The museum started in 1934 when the Benakis donated 37,000 Islamic and Byzantine objects. Other donations over the years have made the Benaki Museum one of Greece’s top museums.

14. National Garden

National Garden

 

In the heart of Athens, the National Garden provides a green oasis for sunny afternoon trips. The Royal Garden has a private garden for the Royal Palace, which is now the Parliament Building. The Public Garden was established in 1923. This is a quiet and peaceful place away from the bustling city with a gorgeous green canopy of trees and vibrant plant life. Statues decorate the gardens as well as flowerbeds and small ruins of antiquity. The gardens of Zappeion can also be found here, which surround the ancient congress hall that was built in the 19th century.

13. Panathenaic Stadium

Panathenaic Stadium

 

Though built by the ancients, Panathenaic Stadium holds a special place in sports history. This original stadium, which dates to around 300 BC and was rebuilt in 144, has hosted several Olympics. More importantly, the stadium is where the Olympic flame starts on its journey to the nation hosting that year’s athletic contests. In ancient times, the stadium hosted a religious festival dedicated to the goddess Athena every four years. The current structure was restored in the 19th century for the first modern version of the Olympics Games after centuries of disuse. Panathenaic Stadium seats 50,000 spectators and is the largest stadium in the world made entirely of marble. The stadium is a major attraction in Athens.

12. Monastiraki

Monastiraki

 

Travelers who like to shop ‘til they drop may enjoy a visit to Monastiraki, a huge market and neighborhood in the historic district in Athens. On weekdays, there is a normal marketplace with shops selling souvenirs. On the weekends, it transforms into a huge flea market, with vendors carting in tables and carpets from which they sell junk, antiques and everything in-between. One of Athens’ top shopping areas, Monastiraki is a good place to buy clothing, icons and souvenirs, and people watch from a sidewalk café. Haggling over prices is expected here, but be wary about paying antique prices for a fake made in another country.

11. Odeon of Herodes Atticus

Odeon of Herodes Atticus

 

The Odeon of Herodes Atticus was – and is – a top music venue in Athens. Built in 161 by Herodes Atticus in memory of his wife, the amphitheatre could seat more than 6,000 in steeply sloped tiers at the base of the Acropolis. Alas, it was destroyed by invaders a hundred years later, only to be resurrected in the 1950s. It hosts the annual Athens Festival, an annual celebration featuring performances by international entertainers. The odeon also is a good place to take in classical Greek performances. Although a roof covered the theatre in ancient times, everything takes place under the stars today.

10. New Acropolis Museum

New Acropolis Museum

 

A main stop on any Athens tour is the New Acropolis Museum, which resides near the base of the hill overlooking the city. It has the largest collection of Greek architecture and ancient sculptures including statues of the goddess Athena and “Kritios Boy.” The museum was originally scheduled to be built in time for the 2004 Olympics, but its completion was delayed due to legal battles. The museum has five floors that showcase 4,000 artifacts. Permanent exhibitions here include the Parthenon Frieze, Athena statue, Color the Peplos Kore, Parthenon Gallery and Athena Nike.

9. Mount Lycabettus

Mount Lycabettus

 

For romantic evenings, gorgeous sunsets and an amazing panoramic view of Athens, Mount Lycabettus is an incredible adventure. As the highest point in Athens, it allows visitors to see all across the Attica basin and the Aegean Sea. Climbers can also see as the chapel of St. George from its peak. A little cafe here will serve up a fantastic dinner for two. To start the hike, visitors go up the path that begins at the end of Aristippou Street in Kolonaki. The path continues to wind upwards around the mountain. Visitors can also take the funicular, which departs from Ploutarchou and Aristippou Street.

8. National Archaeological Museum

National Archaeological Museum

 

For visitors who love art exhibitions, there is no better place to visit in Greece than the National Archaeological Museum. Multiple collections can be found here from contemporary artists all the way back to antiquity. The museum also has a large collection of artwork dating back to the Neolithic Age. The collections include small vases, working tools, clay vases and other small artifacts that are some of the oldest archaeological finds dating back to the 7th millennium. Over thirty rooms, sculptures from every century can be viewed including ancient Kouroi Egyptian sculptures.

7. Syntagma Square

Syntagma Square

 

A major point of interest for any traveler to Athens is the Syntagma Square. The most famous aspect of Syntagma is the changing of the guards by the Evzones in front of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The Hellenic Parliament Building is located here as well as various buses, trolleys and tram stops. A fountain, ancient statues and two large grassy areas offer the picture perfect place for photos and picnics. Most major events that occur in Greece have been celebrated at the Syntagma Square. It’s also the site of various political functions, and it was also at this square that the Military Junta government was overthrown in 1974. Besides the Hellenic Parliament building, other interests include the historic hotels Grande Bretagne and George II.

6. Temple of Olympian Zeus

Temple of Olympian Zeus

 

The Temple of Olympian Zeus is known as the largest temple in Greece. The massive ancient complex took nearly seven centuries to complete. Building originally began in 515 BC by order of Peisistratos, but work stopped on the temple as it was seen as oppressive as Peisistratos and his son were seen as tyrants by the Athenians. Work resumed in 175 BC but was halted 10 years later when the Roman architect Cossutius died. Under emperor Hardian in 132 BC, the temple was finally completed and dedicated to Zeus Olympios. The temple stands today mostly as a reminder of Greek history, but only 15 of 104 huge columns remain. The columns each rise 17 meters (57 feet) into the air and once surrounded a cella where two large statues were once placed.

5. Erechtheum

Erechtheum

 

The Erechtheus or Erechtheion is a temple made from Pentelic marble. It’s located on the Acropolis, and it’s one of the legendary pieces of Greek architecture. Its construction dates back to c. 421 and 405 when the earlier temple to Athena was destroyed by the Persian invasion. The Erechtheum was once a sanctuary dedicated to Athena Polias, Erechtheus and Poseidon. Visitors can access the shrine to Athena by going through the eastern portico. The northern portico leads to the western cella. The Porch of the Caryatids can be found through the southern portico. The six draped female figures can be found here that support the entablature, which is the Erechtheum’s most defining feature.

4. Ancient Agora

Ancient Agora

 

Located to the northwest of the Acropolis, the ancient Agora of Athens was once a marketplace and civic center. The people gathered here to browse all kinds of commodities. It was also a place to meet others and talk about politics, business, current events and the nature of the universe and divine. The ancient Greek democracy can actually be traced to this ancient spot. It’s a wonderful area to look at the cultural beginnings of Athens. Overlooking the Ancient Agora from its elevated position on the hill of Agoraios Kolonos, the Temple of Hephaistos was built in the 5th century BC. Similar in style but smaller than the Parthenon, the temple consists of 34 Doric columns that support a still partially intact roof. It is the best preserved temple in all of Greece thanks to its conversion into a church in the 7th century.

3. Plaka

Plaka

 

One of the most popular tourist attractions in Athens is the Plaka District, which resides under the Acropolis and spreads out to Syntagma. This village is almost like an island within the city, and it’s the perfect way to experience authentic Greek culture. The area is quite private and boasts truly unique scenery with several cafes, ancient trees, green leaf canopies and stone walkways. The area is well-known for its food, boutique shops and cafes. Along Kydathineon Street, visitors find the Jewish Museum, Folk-Art Museum and Saita Taverna, which serves delicious bakalairo and other grilled meats.

2. Parthenon
Parthenon

 

The Parthenon is the most famous building in Athens and all of Greece. It stands majestically at the top of the Acropolis and is considered the epitome of Doric architecture, the simplest of Greek architectural styles. The temple was built to honor the goddess Athena Parthenos, the patron of Athens, to thank her for protecting the city during the Persian Wars. Situated on the site of a former temple to Athena, the Parthenon was considered completed in 438 BC, when Athens was at its peak. The symbol of ancient Greece, the Parthenon is decorated with sculptures that are considered outstanding examples of Greek art.

1. Acropolis 

#1 of Tourist Attractions In Athens

 

No visit to Athens is complete without a visit to the Acropolis, the most famous hill in the Greek capital. It’s impossible not to visit this landmark since so many important Greek ruins are located here, including an old citadel for which it is named. Though only 156 meters (511 feet) high, the Acropolis is considered the highest point in the spirit of ancient Greek culture. From the Parthenon at the summit, travelers can look down on monuments built on its sides as well as over a more modem Athens. The buildings on this hill are considered a great blending of architecture with natural surroundings.


Top Tourist Attractions in Amsterdam

One of the most popular travel destinations in Europe, Amsterdam is a compact, charming and cosmopolitan city that invites exploration. Known as the “Venice of the North” for its more than 100 canals, the capital of the Netherlands offers easy sightseeing adventures by foot, bike and boat. Amsterdam’s well-preserved and appealing 17th-century architecture provides a quaint if incongruous backdrop for a city famous for its modern, progressive attitudes. From the city’s fine art museums to its colorful flower markets, from cannabis-selling “coffeeshops” to the red light district, there’s something exciting and unique to discover in Amsterdam at every turn.

10. Koninklijk Paleis Amsterdam

Koninklijk Paleis Amsterdam

 

One of three royal palaces in the Netherlands, the Koninklijk Paleis in Amsterdam is located on the western side of Dam Square in the center of the city. The 17th structure began life as the city’s town hall, but was converted into a palace during the Napoleonic Wars when Napoleon’s brother Louis was crowned King Louis I of Holland. Although the exterior was constructed by Jacob van Campen with sandstone to mimic the public buildings of Rome, the interior is a premier example of the elaborate Empire style of the early 1800s. The palace is still used by the Dutch Royal House for Royal events but is open to the public for most of the year.

9. De Wallen

De Wallen

 

De Wallen is Amsterdam’s infamous red-light district, the city’s designated area for legalized prostitution. The neighborhood covers several canals and side streets to the south of Central Station. More than one hundred one-room apartments are rented by sex workers who entice onlookers from behind windows illuminated with red lights. A strong police presence keeps the neighborhood safe. Although taking pictures is not allowed, visitors are welcome. As the oldest section in Amsterdam, the district is also home to several historic buildings, including the city’s oldest church, the Gothic-style Oude Kerk.

8. Scheepvaartmuseum

Scheepvaartmuseum

 

Artifacts from Amsterdam’s rich nautical history are housed within the Scheepvaartmuseum, or National Maritime Museum. Formerly a naval storehouse constructed in 1656, the museum features 18 rooms of exhibits and artifacts. Sea trade made Amsterdam the world’s wealthiest city during the 1600s, and this multi-story museum demonstrates how the Dutch dominated the seas with exhibits that range from depictions of historical sea battles to artfully drawn maps and 17th-century weapons. The museum’s collection of carvings also gives visitors an up-close look at how sailors passed their time while at sea. Moored outside the museum is a replica of the Amsterdam, an 18th-century ship which sailed between the Netherlands and the East Indies.

7. Vondelpark

Vondelpark

 

Named Nieuwe Park when it opened in 1865, Vondelpark is located in the Oud-Zuid, or Old South district of Amsterdam to the west of the city’s Museum Square. The park earned its current name after a statue of the Joost van den Vondel was placed in the park in 1867. Designed and crafted by sculptor Louis Royer, the statue of the famous 17th-century Dutch poet and playwright became such a familiar landmark that people began to call the park Vondelpark. The park serves as a popular gathering spot for locals and tourists. It’s a place where people can relax, play sports on the grass, bike along pathways and enjoy a herring sandwich or Dutch beer at one of the park’s horeca facilities.

6. Bloemenmarkt

Bloemenmarkt

 

Located between Muntplein and Koningsplein on the south bank of the Singel canal, the Bloemenmarkt is the world’s only floating flower market. Seven days a weeks, flower sellers load stands and floating barges with all of the flowers and bulbs for which the Netherlands is famous. Founded in 1862, the Bloemenmarkt includes more than a dozen different florists and garden shops as well as souvenir stalls. Although locals shop here too, the market is primarily designed to cater to tourists. The bulbs offered for sale have been designated as ready for export, so visitors can purchase tulip, daffodil, narcissus and other bulbs as a lasting memento of their trip to Amsterdam.

5. Anne Frank House

Anne Frank House
Amsterdam’s most visited attraction, the Anne Frank Huis is situated along the Prinsengracht canal. The structure that once hid Anne Frank, her family and four other Jewish people from the Nazi authorities during World War II has been viewed as a memorial to the Holocaust since 1947, when Anne’s father published the diary that Anne wrote while they lived hidden within the building. A plan to preserve the building was hatched in 1955 when developers were planning to demolish the structure. The building opened as a museum in 1960. Visitors can view the rooms where Anne lived as well as exhibits that chronicle her all-too-short life.

4. Begijnhof

Begijnhof

 

The district of Begijnhof, or Beguines Courtyard, occupies the center circle of land in Amsterdam’s circular canal system. In the 14th century, the area was an enclosed courtyard that served as a residence for the sisterhood of Catholic Beguines. The Begijnhof wasn’t a convent in the traditional sense because the women were free to leave the order if they chose to marry. When the sisterhood’s chapel was confiscated during the Reformation, they began to worship secretly at the Begijnhof Kapel, a charming structure fitted with marble columns and stained-glass windows. Begijnhof is also home to the English Reformed Church, built around 1392. The city’s oldest preserved wooden house, which dates from around 1465, is located within the Begijnhof as well.

3. Van Gogh Museum

Van Gogh Museum

 

Located on the northwestern side of the Museum Square, or Museumplein, the Van Gogh Museum is home to the world’s largest collection of the artist’s paintings and letters. Housed in a four-story building designed by Gerrit Rietveld in the 1970s, the museum is one of the most visited tourist attractions in Amsterdam. Two hundred paintings from the Dutch Post-Impressionist occupy the second story of the museum. Displayed chronologically, the artwork offers viewers an intimate look at Van Gogh’s evolving style. The third story contains information about the artist’s troubled life and about the efforts taken to restore his paintings. Works by Van Gogh’s contemporaries, including artists like Millet, Gaugin and Daubigny are exhibited on the top floor.

2. Rijksmuseum

Rijksmuseum

 

Occupying the northeastern section of the Museum Square, the Rijksmuseum is arguably the most important of the nation’s arts and history museums. The total collection numbers more than one million artifacts dating from the 13th century onward. For decades, the collection was housed in buildings all over the country until 1876, when the architect Pierre Cuypers won a design contest and the construction of the Rijksmuseum began. Opened in 1885, the museum currently has around 8,000 objects on display, the most famous of which are paintings by Rembrandt, Frans Hals and Johannes Vemeer. Rembrandt’s masterpiece Night Watch is worth the price of admission alone.


10 Most Popular Attractions in Corfu

Category : Corfu , Europe , Greece

In the heart of the Adriatic Sea is Corfu, one of the Ionian Islands. The Greek island of Corfu, also known as Kerkyra, has been under the control of many different cultures and nations, giving it a cultured and fascinating history. Corfu Town is the biggest town on the island, but there are many more historic landmarks, fishing villages, religious structures and beaches that attract visitors. Take a closer look at the top attractions in Corfu in order to understand all that this Greek island has in store.

10. Saint Spyridon Church

Saint Spyridon Church

 

Arguably the most beautiful of the churches on the island of Corfu is the Saint Spyridon Church, which was constructed in the 1580s. It boasts the highest bell tower in the Ionian Islands, and it is located in the heart of Old Town Corfu. The church houses a collection of relics from St. Spyridon, which belonged to the Voulgaris family until the 16th century. The church’s crypt also houses the remains of the saint himself in a double sarcophagus. Venetian silver and stunning paintings decorate the church, making it a truly breathtaking interior that even those without religious affiliation will appreciate.

9. Mount Pantokrator

Mount Pantokrator

 

The highest peak in all of Corfu is Mount Pantokrator, making the mountain an easily identifiable landmark for residents and visitors alike. From the summit of the peak, it is possible to see all of Corfu in one panoramic view, and even Albania can be spotted off in the distance. Hiking to the summit of Mount Pantokrator takes an average of two hours for a reasonably fit adult, but it is also possible to drive to the top. A 17th century church stands near the summit, reminding visitors about the strong connection between mountains and gods in Greek culture.

8. Old Perithia

Old Perithia

 

For anyone interested in history, or anyone simply fascinated by the traditional culture of the island, one of the top attractions in Corfu is Old Perithia. This village is the oldest that remains in Corfu, though it is almost completely abandoned. Located at the base of Mount Pantokrator, the town was founded as a secure location that offers vantage points to the sea but can’t be seen from the coast. Old Perithia still boasts eight churches and more than 100 traditional Corfiot homes. Travelers can walk through Old Perithia and see some of the few locals that still call the village home, dine at the few tavernas in the village and watch the sheep roam among fig and cherry trees.

7. Old Fortress, Corfu Town

Old Fortress, Corfu Town

 

On the easternmost point of the peninsula where Corfu Town is located stands the Old Fortress of Corfu. Known to Greeks as the Paleo Frourio, this incredible medieval structure was built in 1546 when the Venetians ruled over the island. The history of the site goes back even further, however, as a Byzantine castle one stood where the fortress is currently located. Separated from the town by a moat, the Old Fortress boasts two small peaks, or korypha, that are responsible for the island’s name of Corfu. Inside the fortress, visitors will find several British structures, such as the Church of St. George, which were installed in the place of the original Venetian buildings.

6. Kassiopi

Kassiopi

 

The northeast section of Corfu is home to Kassiopi, a scenic coastal resort that is popular with travelers from around the world. Brits, in particular, gravitate to the resort’s large beaches, fantastic eateries and relaxed atmosphere. Kassiopi is said to have been founded in the third century BC, and a Byzantine fortress still stands on a hill overlooking the town and its beaches. On the pebble beach, all kinds of recreational activities are available, letting visitors enjoy parasailing, horseback riding, scuba diving and swimming.

5. Canal D’Amour, Sidari

Canal D'Amour, Sidari

 

On the western side of the island are several popular resort areas, most of which are busy year-round thanks to international tourism. One, called Sidari, is especially popular thanks to its proximity to a natural landmark known as the Canal de l’Amour. Accessible on foot right at one end of the beach, the Canal de l’Amour is a series of narrow inlets created by sandstone cliffs. Each of the inlets offers something unique, ranging from a pristine strip of white sand to paths that lead to gorgeous stone archways or hidden caverns. Thanks to the cliffs, the inlets are protected by the winds, making them a great place to soak up the sun on cooler days.

4. Vlacherna Monastery

Vlacherna Monastery

 

One of the most iconic landmarks, and one closely associated with the Corfu’s history, is the Vlacherna Monastery. The woman’s monastery is located on a tiny island off the coast. In order to access the island, which is almost entirely covered by the monastery itself, visitors have to walk along the narrow wharf that leads from the coast to Vlacherna. The bright white architecture of the Vlacherna Monastery, built at the end of the 17th century, stands out against the background of the blue waters surrounding it, creating an iconic image that is even more beautiful in person than in photographs.

3. Achilleion Palace

Achilleion Palace

 

One of the most beautiful landmarks in Corfu is the Achilleion Palace. As the name suggests, the palace was built with the theme of Achilles himself, so there is an emphasis throughout the structure on beauty, symmetry and sculpture. The opulent palace was built in 1890 by Empress of Austria Elisabeth of Bavaria (also known as Sisi), a woman known to be obsessed with physical beauty. After the death of her son in 1889, she threw herself into the creation of Achilleion Palace, which served as a summer palace for decades. Visiting the palace today offers the chance to see inside the refurbished rooms as well as the sculpture garden, including the noteworthy sculpture of Achilles dying.

2. Paleokastritsa Beach

Paleokastritsa Beach

 

Paleokastritsa, which translates to the place of the old castle, is a small village in the northwest of Corfu Island. Although there are several monasteries and churches of historic significance located there, the biggest attraction is the main beach. A paved promenade hugs the coast, offering the chance to walk alongside the sand and enjoy views of the water. The beach is a fantastic spot for swimming or sailing, and several restaurants are just steps from the water, serving up coffee, drinks or Corfu’s many culinary specialtie

1. Corfu Old Town

#1 of Attractions In Corfu

 

Arguably the most popular sight in all of Corfu is the Old Town, which is definitely the hub of the island and the spot where visitors will find the greatest concentration of noteworthy historic attractions. Of particular significance is the Palace of St. Michael and St. George, or Palaia Anaktora, which was built in the 19th century and now houses the extensive collections in the Museum of Modern Art. Also in Corfu Old Town is the Esplanade, a promenade and park built by the French when Napoleon was in power. Truly reminiscent of France, the Esplanade is a popular spot in which to stroll and take in the beauty of the Old Town.


Knossos Palace, Crete

Unravel the Secrets of Knossos Palace in Crete

Knossos, the largest Bronze Age archaeological site found on the island of Crete, was the political and ceremonial center of the Minoan culture and civilization. It consisted of an ancient Palace as well as the city that surrounded it. The area is located south of the modern-day city of Iraklion, which is on the north coast of Crete.

Knossos palace at Crete

Archaeologists believe that Knossos was first inhabited during Neolithic times, starting around 6,000 B.C. However, the First Palace on the site was not built until around 1,900 B.C. on top of the ruins of the previous settlements. Around 1,700 B.C., an earthquake or foreign invaders destroyed this Palace, along with other palaces on Crete. Almost immediately, the Palace was rebuilt on a grander but less massive scale.

Archaeological Site of Knossos Palace on the Crete Island, Greece

In 1894, Sir Arthur Evans discovered the Palace of Knossos. However, it was not until 1900 that he and his team were able to start the excavation of the site. His restoration work has been the source of frantic controversy among archeologists ever since, though it does provide the visitor a sense of what the palace might have looked like.

Aged fresco of three women profiles in Knossos

One of the most interesting discoveries in the Palace of Knossos was the large number of murals that decorated the walls. These paintings portrayed a non-militaristic society, one whose activities included fishing, athletic competitions and rituals such as acrobatics on the back of a charging bull.

Procession Fresco

When walking through the Palace, a visitor has the chance to witness some of the amazing frescoes that adorn the walls in several sections. Most of these frescoes are reconstructions by Piet de Jong, and were often recreated from only a few bits of painted plaster. Many original and reconstructed frescoes are housed in the Heraklion Archaeological Museum, with replicas of them adorning the Palace. Many contain paints that are still vivid after 4,000 years. For instance, upon entering the Palace, one can view the stunning Fresco of the Procession. Other frescoes, entitled the Parisianne, Cup Barer and Tripartite Shrine, adorn an area of the Palace called the Piano Nobile, which is a large courtyard.

Dolphins

One of the most popular frescoes, found in the Queen’s Apartments, is the Dolphin Fresco. A replica of this work is found over a doorway in the apartment, while the original is displayed in the Heraklion Archaeological Museum. This fresco, with its bright colors, is considered one of the most striking works of Minoan art within the Palace of Knossos.

Throne room

The Palace incorporated numerous rooms. One of the most dramatic was the Throne Room. It consisted of a large chair, built into the wall, facing several benches. In addition, this room included a tank, which archaeologists believe was an aquarium. On the south wall is a fresco depicting mythical beasts called griffins, with a lion’s body and an eagle’s head.

Tourists

 

One of the most interesting aspects of the Palace of Knossos is its place in Greek mythology. Many myths seem to be based on various aspects of the Palace. These include Daedalus building a Palace with no exit, Icarus traveling to the sun with his wax wings and the Theseus fighting and killing the Minotaur in the Labyrinth.

Jars

 

A walk through the Palace of Knossos allows the visitor to view all the unique aspects of this ancient building as it was in the past. In addition, doing so allows them to take a step into Greek mythology, something that they may only have experienced through a book.


10 Top Tourist Attractions in Greece

Tags :

Category : Europe , Greece

Greece is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world. With over sixty inhabited islands, historic sites that span four millennia, idyllic beaches and towering mountain ranges there is a wide variety of tourist attractions in Greece to explore. And despite the debt crisis with credit downgrades and protest by day, Greece as a travel destination is as popular as it has ever been.

10. Mount Athos

Mount Athos

 

Mount Athos is a mountain and a peninsula in northern Greece. The peninsula, the easternmost “leg” of the larger Halkidiki peninsula houses some 1,400 monks in 20 Eastern Orthodox monasteries. An autonomous state under Greek sovereignty, entry into Mount Athos is strictly controlled and only males are allowed entrance.

9. Mystras

Mystras

 

Situated near ancient Sparta, Mystras served as the capital of the Peloponnesus in the 14th and 15th centuries, ruled by relatives of the Byzantine emperor. The site remained inhabited throughout the Ottoman period but was abandoned in 1832, leaving only the breathtaking medieval ruins, standing in a beautiful landscape.

8. Lindos

Lindos

 

Lindos is a medieval village on the island of Rhodes that is made up of a network of cobbled streets amid whitewashed houses. Above the town rises the acropolis of Lindos, offering spectacular views of the surrounding harbors and coastline. Lindos beach and Saint Pauls beach are only a short distance from the town center.

7. Samaria Gorge

Samaria Gorge

 

The Samariá Gorge is a 16 km (10 miles) long canyon in southwest Crete. Walking the Samariá Gorge is extremely popular and more than a quarter million tourists do so each year. The walk takes 4 to 7 hours and passes through forests of ancient cypresses and pines, then cuts between vertical cliffs through the mountains to emerge at Agia Roumeli on the Libyan sea.

6. Myrtos Beach

Myrtos Beach

 

Located in the north-west of Kefalonia, Myrtos Beach is world-famous for the magical colors of the water. The blue and turquoise colors of the sea contrast sharply with the bright white of the smooth marble pebbles of the beach. The steep mountains and tall cliffs behind Myrtos beach only add to its beauty. For all these reasons Myrtos has previously been voted 12 times as the best beach in Greece.

5. Delphi Theatre

Delphi Theatre

 

In ancient times Delphi was the most important site in ancient Greek religion, home to the sanctuary and oracle of Apollo. The ancient theatre of Delphi was built on a hill giving spectators a view of the entire sanctuary and the spectacular landscape below. It was originally built in the 4th and could seat 5,000 spectators. Today it is one of the top tourist attractions in Greece.

4. Meteora

Meteora

 

Metéora (“suspended in the air”) in central Greece is a collection of six monasteries spectacular situated on top of several rock pillars. The first monastery in Metéora was founded in the 14th century. Access to the monasteries was deliberately difficult, requiring either long ladders or large nets used to haul up both goods and people. This required quite a leap of faith – the ropes were replaced only “when the Lord let them break”.

 

3. Mykonos

Mykonos

 

Mykonos is famed as a cosmopolitan destination amongst the Greek islands and widely recognized as one of the best tourist attractions in Greece. Mykonos Town (Chora) is a stunningly picturesque Cycladic town with a maze of tiny streets and whitewashed steps lanes. It is also known for its sandy beaches and diverse and intense nightlife as evidenced by a vast number of bars and nightclubs.

 

2. Parthenon, Acropolis 

Parthenon, Acropolis

 

The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis is one of the most famous Greece tourist attractions and a visit to Athens is not complete without visiting this temple. The construction of the Parthenon started in 447 BC, replacing and older temple that was destroyed by the Persians, and completed in 432 BC. During its long life the Parthenon has served as a temple, fortress, a church, a mosque and even as a powder magazine.

1. Santorini

#1 of Tourist Attractions In Greece

Santorini is a volcanic island in the Cyclades group of the Greek islands. It is famous for its dramatic views, stunning sunsets, the white-washed houses, and its very own active volcano. Fira, the capital of Santorini, is a marriage of Venetian and Cycladic architecture, whose white cobblestone streets bustle with shops, tavernas, hotels and cafes, while clinging on the edge of the 400 meter (1,300 ft) high cliffs.

Cheap Flights to Athens

Origin Departure date Return date Find Ticket

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15.01.2020

19.01.2020

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Berlin

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09.12.2019

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Sofia

07.12.2019

11.01.2020

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23.11.2019

27.11.2019

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02.12.2019

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Budapest

16.02.2020

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25.01.2020

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16.01.2020

19.01.2020

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02.12.2019

06.12.2019

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09.05.2020

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Milan

22.03.2020

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10 Top Things to Do in Santorini

Category : Greece , Santorini

Breathtaking views from soaring cliffs, whitewashed churches topped with bright blue domes and archeological treasures from a lost civilization are just some of the reasons that the island of Santorini is routinely included in the lists of the best places to visit in the world. Officially named Thira, sunny Santorini is the largest and arguably the loveliest of the Cyclades group of islands located to the southeast of Greece’s mainland in the blue Aegean Sea.

Santorini marks the spot of one of the largest volcanic eruptions in written history. The explosion created an archipelago out a single island and left behind the geological feature that attracts visitors to Santorini today: a giant sea-filled caldera. In addition to enjoying awe-inspiring views of the half-submerged volcanic crater, other things to do in Santorini include exploring Minoan artifacts and ruins buried by the ancient eruption. Famous for its dry white wines, picturesque beaches and vibrant nightlife, Santorini is a popular destination for visitors who just want to relax and unwind too.

10. Ancient Thera

Ancient Thera

 

Situated on high cliffs jutting out into the sea between the beaches of Kamari and Perissa, Ancient Thera features ruins that were excavated in the early 1900s. The ancient tombs, monuments and remnants of homes, churches and fortifications represent a broad range of post-Minoan periods. Standout features include Roman baths, 4th-century Hellenistic structures and a shrine to Apollo marked with 8th-century graffiti. Visitors can climb to the site from the beaches below or can reach the ruins by tour bus, taxi or private car.

9. Therasia (Thirassia)

Therasia

 

The island of Therasia makes an ideal destination for visitors who want to enjoy the sunny ambiance of Santorini, minus the crowds. The largest of the five small villages, also called Therasia, has only around 150 inhabitants. It’s reachable on the caldera side by a long flight of steps up the cliff. The smaller isle boasts the same picturesque architecture as Santorini, and the population shares the same traditions and customs. Whether enjoyed as a day trip or a weekend getaway, Therasia offers visitors an authentic Greek island experience.

8. Pyrgos

Pyrgos

 

Once the capital of Santorini, the inland city of Pyrgos sits atop a hill that offers stunning views of the island from every direction. The remains of a Venetian castle perches on the hill’s summit. Within the castle walls is a church believed to have been constructed in the 10th century. Relatively unspoiled by tourism, Pyrgos features some of the finest examples of medieval architecture on the island. The village is surrounded by wineries, many of which offer tours and tastings. The dessert wine known as vinsanto produced here is considered one of Greece’s best.

7. Museum of Prehistoric Thera

Museum of Prehistoric Thera

 

Located in the capital city of Fira, the Museum of Prehistoric Thera is one of Santorini’s most important cultural attractions. Opened in 2000, the museum features treasures unearthed at the Akrotiri dig, including an extensive collection of colorful frescoes. A depiction of women gathering saffron from crocus flowers offers insight into the daily lives of the island’s early inhabitants. While frescoes of swallows are easy to understand, as swallows still roost on the cliffs of the caldera, a depiction of blue monkeys has scholars baffled. Historians have found no evidence that monkeys ever lived on Santorini.

6. Kamari Beach

Kamari Beach

 

The largest beach on Santorini and the most popular, Kamari is located along the seashore of the village of the same name. The town and beach get their name from the small arch or “kamara” wedged into the cliffs at the southern end of the beach, the remains of a shrine dedicated to Poseidon. Notable for its black sand and pebbled shoreline, Kamari is the most developed beach on the island, and the beach is lined with hotels, bars and nightclubs. Next to sunbathing and people watching, snorkeling and scuba diving are popular activities.

5. Akrotiri Excavations

Akrotiri Excavations

 

Known as the “Minoan Pompeii”, the flourishing town of Akrotiri was at once destroyed and preserved around 1500 BC by a volcanic eruption. The town wasn’t discovered until the 1860s when workers collecting dirt for the construction of the Suez Canal stumbled upon the site. An outpost of Crete, Akrotiri was settled by Minoans as early as 3000 BC and reached its peak after 2000 BC, when it developed trade and agriculture and settled the present town. Some of the structures are three stories high with stone staircases and stores of large ceramic jars and pottery. Recently reopened to the public, Akrotiri offers visitors a unique glimpse of what life in Santorini was like during the Bronze Age.

4. Perissa Beach

Perissa Beach

 

Perissa Beach is almost a mirror image of Kamari Beach, which is located on the northern side of the rocky headland separating the two stretches of black sand. With fewer restaurants, bars and clubs, Perissa is slightly less developed than Kamari and a bit less crowded. The sand is of a finer grain too, which makes it preferable for long strolls on the beach. Water taxis are available that make it easy for travelers to visit both beaches. A dive center located in Perissa village offers snorkeling and scuba diving trips.

3. Nea Kameni

Nea Kameni

 

The Santorini volcano’s grand eruption occurred nearly 3,700 years ago, blowing the top off the original island. Sea water rushed into the caldera, forming a massive lagoon that’s so deep that all but the largest cruise ships can anchor in the harbor. There are two small volcanic islands at the center of the caldera, Nea Kameni and Palea Kameni (New & Old Kameni). Nea Kameni is a barren island, visited daily by dozens of tourist boats throughout the summer. Visitors climb a gravel path to reach the top of the 130-meter (430-foot) high volcanic crater, where it is possible to complete a full circuit of the rim.

2. Fira

Fira

 

The capital of Santorini, Fira boasts one of the most spectacular locations of all the island’s towns and villages. Perched along the edge of the sky-high caldera, the city’s white sugar-cube-shaped buildings offer incredible views of the shoreline and the Aegean Sea, especially at sunset when the entire town is bathed in golden light. The central streets of Fira are filled with all kind of shops, jewelries, restaurants, cafes, bars and nightclubs and get very crowded in the high season. Visitors who arrive by sea can reach Fira by climbing the zigzagging staircase up the face of cliff. Less adventurous travelers can whiz to the top in a cable car.

1. Oia

#1 of Things To Do In Santorini

 

Famed for its stunning sunsets, Oia is a little bit less hectic than Fira and a top tourist attraction in Santorini. The village is also situated on top of an impressive cliff and features charming houses in narrow streets, blue domed churches, and sun-bathed verandas. One of the most beautiful villages on the island, Oia was once home to a prosperous merchant fleet that traded with countries on Mediterranean Sea during the 1800s and early 1900s. Although part of the city was destroyed by earthquake in 1956, remnants of its seafaring past endure. Elegant sea captain’s houses occupy the best part of town and offer the most impressive views of the caldera.

Cheap Flights to Santorini

Origin Departure date Return date Find Ticket

Athens

26.10.2019

02.11.2019

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Heraklion

18.05.2020

20.05.2020

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Rome

03.06.2020

07.06.2020

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Kiev

11.04.2020

17.04.2020

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21.10.2019

02.11.2019

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London

25.01.2020

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05.02.2020

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21.11.2019

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30.05.2020

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23.05.2020

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Berlin

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16.01.2020

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21.10.2019

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08.03.2020

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Helsinki

05.02.2020

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Kazan

13.11.2019

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Marseille

11.01.2020

19.01.2020

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Prague

08.11.2019

11.11.2019

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Bordeaux

18.05.2020

24.05.2020

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Krasnodar

30.11.2019

07.12.2019

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30.10.2019

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Seville

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05.11.2019

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23.10.2019

29.10.2019

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Venice

20.05.2020

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Belgrade

26.06.2020

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05.05.2020

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04.05.2020

11.05.2020

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05.11.2019

10.11.2019

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01.11.2019

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Ljubljana

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26.10.2019

31.10.2019

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Yerevan

26.10.2019

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Riga

26.10.2019

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08.01.2020

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Muscat

28.12.2019

02.01.2020

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25.04.2020

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Kharkiv

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Astana

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13.02.2020

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Amsterdam

10.11.2019

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Frankfurt

04.06.2020

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Stuttgart

04.06.2020

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Odessa

01.11.2019

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23.10.2019

30.10.2019

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26.10.2019

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Volgograd

20.10.2019

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Glasgow

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23.06.2020

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Chicago

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29.02.2020

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Toronto

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Tickets from 739

Faro

06.02.2020

10.02.2020

Tickets from 746

Voronezh

10.08.2020

20.08.2020

Tickets from 748

Copenhagen

25.06.2020

02.07.2020

Tickets from 757

Anapa

27.10.2019

03.11.2019

Tickets from 769

Barcelona

15.06.2020

22.06.2020

Tickets from 811

Munich

31.10.2019

10.11.2019

Tickets from 812

Hamburg

30.10.2019

03.11.2019

Tickets from 814

Oakland

03.06.2020

23.06.2020

Tickets from 826

Mulhouse

08.04.2020

12.04.2020

Tickets from 841

Dublin

10.01.2020

19.01.2020

Tickets from 843

Seattle

19.11.2019

26.11.2019

Tickets from 853

Accra

25.10.2019

01.11.2019

Tickets from 866

Krakow

08.11.2019

11.11.2019

Tickets from 869

Phoenix

13.05.2020

17.05.2020

Tickets from 886

Tashkent

08.08.2020

15.08.2020

Tickets from 896

Sharm el-Sheikh

01.11.2019

10.11.2019

Tickets from 902

Kuala Lumpur

01.05.2020

07.05.2020

Tickets from 906

Vancouver

10.11.2019

29.11.2019

Tickets from 913

Nice

20.06.2020

29.06.2020

Tickets from 923

Tyumen

02.12.2019

09.12.2019

Tickets from 933

Cardiff

16.02.2020

20.02.2020

Tickets from 949

Alexandria

01.11.2019

10.11.2019

Tickets from 955

New York

01.11.2019

08.11.2019

Tickets from 964

Leeds

24.10.2019

31.10.2019

Tickets from 988

Riyadh

23.01.2020

30.01.2020

Tickets from 1 019

Brussels

01.11.2019

03.11.2019

Tickets from 1 069

Hotels in Santorini Island: 5 stars

Hotel Stars Discount Price per night, from Choose dates

Homeric Poems

★★★★★

-26%

358266

View Hotel

Oia Santo Maris Luxury Suites and Spa

★★★★★

-9%

361327

View Hotel

Canaves Oia Suites & Spa

★★★★★

-35%

506329

View Hotel

Andronis Concept Wellness Resort

★★★★★

-39%

459280

View Hotel

The Dream Santorini

★★★★★

-35%

253164

View Hotel

Canaves Oia Epitome - Small Luxury Hotels of the World

★★★★★

-49%

547279

View Hotel

Avaton Resort And Spa

★★★★★

-32%

240162

View Hotel

Elite Luxury Suites

★★★★★

-23%

441338

View Hotel

Andronis Luxury Suites

★★★★★

-6%

471443

View Hotel

Mystique, a Luxury Collection Hotel, Santorini

★★★★★

-24%

509387

View Hotel

Santorini Secret Suites & Spa, Small Luxury Hotels of the World

★★★★★

-19%

354287

View Hotel

Gold Suites - Small Luxury Hotels of the World

★★★★★

-37%

257161

View Hotel

Lilium Santorini Villa

★★★★★

-9%

205187

View Hotel

Santorini Kastelli Resort

★★★★★

-10%

113102

View Hotel

Grace Hotel Santorini, Auberge Resorts Collection

★★★★★

-46%

775417

View Hotel

Cavo Bianco

★★★★★

-32%

14599

View Hotel

Vedema, a Luxury Collection Resort, Santorini

★★★★★

-29%

331236

View Hotel

Honeymoon Petra Villas

★★★★★

-6%

288272

View Hotel

Chromata, The Leading Hotels of the World

★★★★★

-41%

333196

View Hotel

La Mer Deluxe Hotel & Spa

★★★★★

-37%

165105

View Hotel


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